Friday, November 19, 2010

My Way: Imperium Statues


About a week ago, Rushputin over at Warpstone Pile posted a great pair of articles (here and here, read them) on the statues of the Imperium, and specifically the verdigris version thereof. He was extremely kind to mention that he’d, at least initially, based his approach on my verdigris posts (which you can find here and here). 

I’m generally both tremendously pleased and dreadfully nervous when a reader experiments with a recipe that I’ve suggested. I’m flattered, naturally, but I’m also terrified that he (or, I suppose, she) will not be pleased with the result, and that I will be responsible for any ensuing disappointment, befuddlement, calamity...

At the time I read the articles mentioned above, I’d just decided to revisit a pair of my own statues, which I’d started then abandoned (the photo above is an early WIP, and I promise that I’ll not moan about the horrors of October again). I’d been hoping to create a version of highly-weathered copper, or tin, or whathaveyou for these statues. 

Like Rushputin, I began with an inspirational photo (pictured here) that I’d taken in Copenhagen a year or so ago, and thought that I would simply press my recipes into service in the traditional capacity while sticking quite closely to what I thought I already knew. The way I figured it, I’d only need to pull one color or another forward in order to more readily match the inspirational hue: more turquoise, less green, etc. The problem, however, was that I was only looking at the colors, and not the actual statue I'd taken as a starting point.

Well. I suspect, by now, you know where this is going. As fate would have it, both my hopes and my fears came true. Rushputin painted up some stunning models, but he did so with very little help from my suggestions. In fact, Rushputin quickly discovered that something was rather amiss with the recipe when applied to statues.

The premise of my recipes is, quite simply, that the worn edges maintain their metallic shine, while the recesses hold the rich patina. It works for my CSM Terminators, but statues don’t really have worn edges the way armor will.

I had never thought of that. Go figure.

So. Rushputin inverted the approach (if not the entire recipe) and worked from a metallic base toward the greens and blues and general verdi coloring as a kind of highlight rather than focusing on the shaded recesses. Brilliant! -such an intuitive solution. The weathering on the statue now settled on the parts that would be most weathered, while those areas more protected from the elements would maintain more of the original metallic hues.

 
In that one simple gesture, Rushputin illuminated the theme for this week: I need to take a new look at my old habits. Cheers, Rush. The statues aren't yet finished, but they're a world better than they would have been if I'd stuck to my routine.

See you Sunday for more WIP…

10 comments:

Loquacious said...

They're still beautiful! They do look a mite mopey, though... like they lost their puppy dog or something =p

jabberjabber said...

Great work on the research for the verdigris! The statues are going to great when finished.

#2501 said...

Are you going to keep the plinths that sandstone colour or weather them as well?

b.smoove said...

@ Loquacious. Indeed. The Emperor's Puppy!

@ JabberJabber. Thanks. By the way, I recently had a look at your proofing recommendations for the beta -very, very helpful. Thank you.

@ #2501. I was thinking that the plinths are going to get my standard bone/stone treatment that I've been using of late, but haven't decided for certain. That's not much of an answer, I know.

Warhammer39999 said...

At that scale, the effect really works wonders. This post alone has almost inspired me to go spend some money on overgrown space marine statues...

Rushputin said...

Thanks for your kind words!

I think your color choice is much better than mine: the green I'm using works, but it works much, much better with the turquoise.

b.smoove said...

@ WH39.9K. Thank you kindly. I've had some fun with these; they are easy and fast and look quite sturdy, in my opinion. I recommend.

@ Rush. Thank you, sir. I was inspired by your approach.

Red said...

Wow I like these a lot! I definitely want to get one or two of these guys one day and I love the way you have painted yours.

sonsoftaurus said...

With regards to verdigris, I stumbled upon an interesting option at the craft store (Michaels, in my case). I can't recall the name unfortunately but it was by some sprays/gold leaf type of products.

Liquid, comes in bottles. Basically chemicals that work on the appropriate metals to create actual verdigris or rust. Also have conveniently enough liquid stuff can brush on that has iron or bronze in it for the other stuff to work on. So should be able to paint on the bronze stuff, wait a day for it to dry then use the verdigris stuff to get the real thing. Then seal it up so that the stuff (esp if doing rust) doesn't come off.

I didn't get any at the time since I'm not doing something where I'd want those effects right now, but I plan to give it a shot sometime. Could get the bottles individually for like 5.99USD or in a set (iron+rust, bronze+verdigris) for 11.99USD.

b.smoove said...

@ Red. Thank you.

@ Sons. Now that is an idea made of gold (or whathaveyou). Perhaps a scouting run to the store is in order. Thank you for the top tip!