Monday, December 27, 2010

Commissar C. Ludo Baracca and the Fazzoletti


Roberto Vo5 once remarked to me that time is relative when one is with one’s relatives. And that is true. I hope and trust that all spent an enjoyable weekend.

For my part, I feel like I’ve returned from a dramatic spell at sea. I picked up a paintbrush today for the first time in what feels like an eon –but, in fact, was something considerably more like a week. Still, it felt good to be back amongst the minions, making progress once again. I have so many projects on the burner right now that are three-quarters finished that I feel obligated to sift through them just to clear room on the desk… for at least two more really grand and ambitious projects that are patiently waiting in the margins (templars. cough. bretonnians. cough. cough).

Well. Nevermind all that.

In the thick of it today, I managed to finish (for now –I never really mean “finish” when I say finish. I suspect more than a few of you feel the same about your own ceaseless endeavors) Commissar C. Ludo Baracca and his merciless Fazzoletti. They’ve yet to be coated, but are otherwise restless and ready... which is well enough, as Pitmann is meant to stop round on Thursday for some much needed holiday gaming.

C. Ludo Baracca was rather unsubtly inspired by the WWI Ace of a shamelessly similar name (there's another aspect of his personal history that I find quite intriguing as well but more on that another time),  while I’ve imagined his Fazzoletti as having taken their name from the distinctive bandannas that mark them as workers from his estates back home. Though I suspect that this history is grand, terrible, and compelling, they’ve yet to actually see proper table time, so that history is largely yet unwritten. More to follow, of course.

Before adding Special Wargear and Upgrades, I’ve structured the force as such: Commissar Baracca, naturally, followed by Sergeant Squinzo and roughly nine seasoned, trusted laborers. Throw in a Special Weapon or two, as well as the rusty old Armoured Sentinal SPAD, and we’re somewhere under 200 points –which is an ideal place to find oneself before fleshing out the characters with upgrades.

I suspect that that good Commissar will want to take a Refractor Field, and a Special Weapons member will certainly either take a Targeter or the Crack Shot upgrade. Sergeant Squinzo will almost certainly pick up the Blade Master upgrade to round out the basic formation of the Team. That should get them started in proximity of 225 points. Not bad. Not bad at all.


Needless to say, I’m looking forward to getting them on the table.

5 comments:

Porky said...

The Catachan models really work in that scheme on that terrain board. The background concept is interesting too, and gives them extra character right away.

Known as Ben said...

Love the use of the old school Catachan minis. It's nice to see such detail paid to infantry in an IG army.

Bartender said...

Those must have been fun to paint!

I remember when the Catachan jungle fighters came out for the first time. It was absolutely amazing.

Da Masta Cheef said...

Templars & Bretonnians? but...but....what about the Romans?

b.smoove said...

@ Porky. Cheers mate. Killzone has a way of doing this to otherwise nondescript, simple models.

@ AKA Ben. Thanks. I don't think I could manage a whole army of OOP minis like this, but it was nice to get these guys out in the air and a decent paintjob after so much time under the sofa.

@ Bartender. They are undeniably cool minis.

@ Cheef... never fear. I have neither forgotten nor abandoned the Romans. They are sitting next to Pitmann's Ogres scowling at me as I type. Ave.